Gender Differences in Interpersonal Trust: Disclosure Behavior, Benevolence Sensitivity and Workplace Implications

Qiu, J, Kesebir, S, Gunaydin, G, Selcuk, E and Wasti, A (2022) Gender Differences in Interpersonal Trust: Disclosure Behavior, Benevolence Sensitivity and Workplace Implications. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 169. ISSN 0749-5978 (In Press)

Abstract

Across four studies (N = 4,727), we investigate gender differences in interpersonal trust in work relationships. Drawing on gendered socialization experiences, we propose that feeling able to engage in self-disclosure (disclosure-based trust) is a more fundamental aspect of interpersonal trust for women than for men. Because self-disclosure entails social and emotional risks, we further expect and find that female trustors are more sensitive to others’ benevolence when forming interpersonal trust judgments. Lastly, we show that these gender differences in disclosure-based trust and benevolence sensitivity are associated with divergent responses to benevolent others. Specifically, we test a moderated mediation model and find that benevolent supervisors are associated with higher quality supervisor relationships and greater well-being for women than for men, mediated through higher levels of disclosure-based trust. We discuss the implications of these findings for work relationships and career outcomes.

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Item Type: Article
Subject Areas: Organisational Behaviour
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© 2022 Elsevier. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-NC licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4/0

Date Deposited: 18 Jan 2022 18:03
Date of first compliant deposit: 14 Jan 2022
Subjects: Organisational behaviour
Last Modified: 10 May 2022 11:26
URI: https://lbsresearch.london.edu/id/eprint/2200
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